The Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation is one of the greatest attractions in the state of Michigan. Beginning in 1906, Henry Ford began collecting objects of historical importance that are now housed in the museum. What kinds of things did Ford collect? George Washington’s camp bed, an Oscar Meyer Wienermobile, the chair from Ford’s Theater where Abraham Lincoln was shot, the bus where Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat, Thomas Edison’s last breath in a sealed tube, a collection of Presidential vehicles including the limousine where John F. Kennedy was assassinated, a replica of the Wright Brother’s flyer, and many other fascinating objects from American History. The “of American Innovation” was only recently added to the museum’s name to clarify that this is Henry Ford’s museum, not a museum of the life of Henry Ford.

Originally known as the Edison Institute, the museum was dedicated by President Herbert Hoover on the fiftieth anniversary of Edison’s first successful incandescent light bulb. In attendance at the dedication were  Marie Curie, George Eastman, John D. Rockefeller, Will Rogers, and Orville Wright. (wiki) One of my favorite pieces in the museum is a painting near the entrance to the museum that depicts the dedication of the museum and you can see all of the famous faces sitting in the place where you currently stand.

The Henry Ford (the complex that houses the museum as well as Greenfield Village and The Rouge Factory Tour) is known as America’s Greatest History Attraction  for a reason. I believe everyone should make a point to visit at some point in their life. The exhibits in the museum are well put together and there are things here that you will not find in any other museum. I always manage to find something new and interesting each time I visit.

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