Go See Do Photography

A Lot of Travel, A Little Bit of History, and a Whole Bunch of Photos

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Wordless Wednesday: The End of the World

East Coast Road Trip Recap

The view from Cadillac Mountain

Another Epic Road Trip is a wraps! 8 states – 4 of which were new to me. This was my third time in New York, but the first time out of New York City and the first time getting into New York by car (the first time was by train and the second was by boat). This was a varied trip. Over 9 nights we stayed at 3 hotels, 1 AirBNB, and 2 campgrounds. It was a very busy trip and we saw a lot of interesting places! I am excited to share the stories with you here!

Here is our itinerary and a preview of what is to come in this trip report:

Night 1: Syracuse, NY
Onieda House Museum
Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art
Minuteman National Historic Park
Night 2: Auburn, MA
Boston Museum of Fine Art
Boston Freedom Trail
Night 3: Cambridge, MA
House of Seven Gables & Salem
Portland, ME
Night 4: Seawall, ME
Acadia National Park – Park Loop Road
Jordan Pond House
Acadian Nature Cruise
Night 5: Seallwall, ME
Jordan Pond Hike
Night 6: Seawall, ME
Maine Lighthouses
Night 7: Keene, NH
Albany Museum of Art and History
Watkins Glen Hike
Night 8: Watkins Glen, NY
Corning Museum of Glass
Rockwell Museum
Seneca Lake Wine Trail
Night 9: Watkins Glen, NY
Erie Land Light
Home

We were able to see so many different museums on this trip because of the ROAM – reciprocal museum admission program. I’ve mentioned before that we are members of the Detroit Institute of Arts. Before this trip, we upgraded our membership to a level that includes this reciprocal admissions program. 6 of the 7 museums that we visited were included and we were able to get in for free. If you enjoy museums, look into a ROAM membership before your next trip. It may save you money and it will definitely allow you to check out museums that you may not have visited without it. Check out a list of participating museums here.

Be sure to check back next week for my take on the Onieda House Museum. If you like my photos be sure to “like” my Facebook Page, follow me on Instagram, and Flickr! You can purchase prints on Etsy and Fine Art America. To see inside my camera bag, check out my Gear Page. For information about our new Guided Photography Tours, visit GuidedPhoto.com.

Star Wars and The Power of Costume

Star Wars and the Power of Costume is the newest exhibit at the Detroit Institute of Arts and it is drawing quite a crowd. The exhibit features some of the most recognizable costumes from the epic film saga such as Chewbacca (above), Darth Vader, and Queen Amidala (below). The exhibit focuses on the creative process behind the design of the costumes and what it took to make George Lucas’ vision a reality. Most of the costumes were from the prequels and the most recent films, but there were a few remaining costumes from the original trilogy on display. Not surprisingly, this exhibit is popular. I thought the lines for the Monet exhibit were long, but the lines for this exhibit are longer.

I am in no means a Star Wars fan. I saw the first film probably 15 years ago and had no interest to see any of the sequels/prequels. This exhibit really made me want to give the franchise another chance. Getting an up close view of these fascinating works of art and their stories truly intrigued me. I also enjoyed the audio tour that included anecdotes from people who worked on the films as well as DIA curators. It really added an extra layer to a very interesting art exhibit. There is also an audio tour for children (or adults) that teaches them how to be a Jedi.

Star Wars and the Power of Costume is on exhibit at the DIA until September 30. Tickets for the exhibit sell out fast so it is recommended that you purchase them online beforehand. If you like my photos be sure to “like” my Facebook Page, follow me on Instagram, and Flickr! You can purchase prints on Etsy and Fine Art America. To see inside my camera bag, check out my Gear Page. For information about our new Guided Photography Tours, visit GuidedPhoto.com.

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Balloonfest

The Michigan Challenge Balloonfest is one of my favorite summer festivals! It is definitely my favorite to photograph. So many festivals are just an excuse to sell stuff and host a carnival. Balloonfest is a three day long Hot Air Balloon competition in which balloon pilots fly to or from a specific destination and toss beanbags at targets to score points. It is fun to watch the teams unpack their balloons, see them inflate, and fly to their destinations. It seems like Hot Air Balloon Festivals are popping up all around, but the Howell one was the first in the area. That being said, if there is a hot air balloon festival in your area, I highly recommend checking it out!

The Balloon Glow (top) is one of my favorite parts of Balloonfest and it is when the balloons tie down and light up after dark. As you can see from the picture, this is definitely a popular event, with chairs lined up all the way around the main stage area. Balloonfest is very weather sensitive event. The FAA and the local airport is consulted on whether or not it is safe for the balloons to fly. I was excited to see the glowing skydivers as well, but unfortunately, that was cancelled due to high winds.

This year, a balloon accident at the festival made the news. Luckily no one was injured, but the video (above) is terrifying!

Thanks for stopping by! If you like my photos be sure to “like” my Facebook Page, follow me on Instagram, and Flickr! You can purchase prints on Etsy and Fine Art America. To see inside my camera bag, check out my Gear Page. For information about our new Guided Photography Tours, visit GuidedPhoto.com.

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Wordless Wednesday: Old Man’s Falls

Hiking Hocking Hills: Old Man’s Cave

 Old Man’s Cave is the most popular area of Hocking Hills State Park. It is the center of the park. The campground is here and of all the trails in the park, Old Man’s Cave had the most to see. Anticipating the crowds, I decided to visit Old Man’s Cave on Monday morning figuring that the weekend visitors would be gone and the crowds would be less. The rain that had been forecasted all weekend, finally came and I think that helped keep the crowds down too. If you were spending the whole week in Hocking Hills, you were not going hiking in the rain.

As you can see in the above photo, there were still people around and I was glad they were there. I used to be afraid of having people in my landscape photos. Now, I feel like the people in that photo add a frame of reference to the landscape. You can’t tell how big the cave is without people in it for perspective. The people also add life to the photos. They show that this is an area that people explore. They give meaning to the bridges and steps in the landscape.

Old Man’s Cave Upper Falls

While the rain kept the crowds down, it also really added to the atmosphere. Walking through the rainy, foggy, gorges felt like walking through another planet. It felt unreal. It reminded me of walking through Disney World, but this was not created by people. Really, words cannot describe this area. It has to be seen to be comprehended.

As I mentioned, the Old Man’s Cave Trail had the most to see of all the trails in Hocking Hills. There are five main sections of the Old Man’s Cave area, making up about one mile of trails: Upper Falls, Upper Gorge, Middle Falls, Lower Falls and Lower Gorge. Of course, one of the features of the trail is Old Man’s Cave (top) where a hermit lived in the late 1700s. The Grandma Gatewood Trail also begins here and continues on to Ash Cave and Cedar Falls.

Read more in my Hiking Hocking Hills Series: Camping & Hiking Hocking Hills, Ash Cave, Cedar Falls, Conkle’s Hollow and Rock House. To plan your trip to Hocking Hills, visit HockingHills.com If you like my photos be sure to “like” my Facebook Page, follow me on Instagram, and Flickr! You can purchase prints on Etsy and Fine Art America. To see inside my camera bag, check out my Gear Page. For information about our new Guided Photography Tours, visit GuidedPhoto.com.

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Wordless Wednesday: Balloons

Hiking Hocking Hills: Rock House

The hike to Rock House was the last hike of our full day in Hocking Hills and it was the hardest hike we did. Rock House is the only true cave in the park. It has a ceiling that is 25 feet tall and the main corridor is 200 feet long and is 30 feet wide in spots. Native Americans used the Hominy Holes as baking ovens. Troughs and holding tanks have been carved in the stone to collect rain water. Robbers, murderers and bootleggers once used this out of the way cave as a hideout. A hotel was once erected on the grounds on what is now the picnic shelter. (HockingHills.com)

The Rock House trail is only a half mile long but it is a half mile of large, uneven, sandstone steps. The trail is narrow and children and dogs should be closely supervised. The rock house at the end was totally worth the climb. It was unlike anything I had ever seen before. The giant rock house was significantly cooler and less humid than the surrounding areas and was nice break at the end of the climb. This would be a great place to visit around magic hour for better lighting for photos. The light was pretty harsh when we were there and made the spot difficult to photograph.

Read more in my Hiking Hocking Hills Series: Camping & Hiking Hocking Hills, Ash Cave, Cedar Falls, Conkle’s Hollow and Old Man’s Cave (coming soon). To plan your trip to Hocking Hills, visit HockingHills.com If you like my photos be sure to “like” my Facebook Page, follow me on Instagram, and Flickr! You can purchase prints on Etsy and Fine Art America. To see inside my camera bag, check out my Gear Page. For information about our new Guided Photography Tours, visit GuidedPhoto.com.

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Wordless Wednesday: Old Man’s Cave

Hiking Hocking Hills: Conkle’s Hollow

The hike at Conkle’s Hollow was my favorite of all of the Hocking Hills trails we explored this visit. Conkle’s Hollow State Nature Preserve is not a park of the State Park but it borders the Hocking Hills State Forest and is less than a ten minute drive from Old Man’s Cave. Conkle’s Hollow was the quietest and least busy of all the sites in the Hocking Hills Region that we visited. I believe that being somewhat separate from the park has a lot to do with that. When we visited, we only saw a handful of other people on the trails. Or course, once we got to the waterfall, there were children playing in the water, like at the other waterfalls. If you are planning a trip to Hocking Hills, don’t discount Conkle’s Hollow because of the drive!

The gorge trail is ADA accessible and was one of the easiest hikes we did in Hocking Hills. The mile long trail follows the river through rugged cliffs, lush greenery, and wildflowers. The small waterfall at the end was stunning in that the sunlight seemed to cascade along with the water into the cave. Of course, if you are into more rugged hikes and have more time than I, the 1.9 mile rim trail offers gorgeous views from the cliffs above. The photos from up there are phenomenal! This would be a great hike to take in the fall.

Thank you for stopping by! Read more in my Hiking Hocking Hills Series: Camping & Hiking Hocking Hills, Ash Cave, Cedar Falls, Rock House and Old Man’s Cave (coming soon). For more information about Conkle’s Hollow, visit the Ohio Nature Preserves. If you like my photos be sure to “like” my Facebook Page, follow me on Instagram, and Flickr! You can purchase prints on Etsy and Fine Art America. To see inside my camera bag, check out my Gear Page. For information about our new Guided Photography Tours, visit GuidedPhoto.com.

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